Blog page 327




                                               

Ketchikan Ranger House

The Ketchikan Ranger House at 309 Gorge Street in Ketchikan, Alaska was built in 1916 in the residential Captains Hill district of Ketchikan. Designed by USDA Forest Service in "Vernacular Victorian" style, it housed the U.S. Forest Services dist ...

                                               

Crisp Point Light

Crisp Point was one of five U.S. Life-Saving Service Stations along the coast of Lake Superior between Munising and Whitefish Point in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Located about 14 miles 23 km west of Whitefish Point, in 1876 it became Life S ...

                                               

Houses of Refuge in Florida

The Houses of Refuge in Florida were a series of stations operated by the United States Life-Saving Service along the coast of Florida to rescue and shelter ship-wrecked sailors. Five houses were constructed on the east coast in 1876, with five m ...

                                               

Indian River Life-Saving Station

The Indian River Life-Saving Station was established at Rehoboth Beach, Delaware in 1876 to rescue mariners shipwrecked along the Delaware coast by the United States Life-Saving Service. The facility was designed in 1874 as a 1-1/2-story board-an ...

                                               

Klipsan Beach Life Saving Station

Klipsan Beach was the site of a station of the United States Life-Saving Service. The station buildings still remain, although they are privately owned. The station is on the National Register of Historic Places. The stations name was originally ...

                                               

Ocean City Life-Saving Station

The Ocean City Life-Saving Station is located on the Boardwalk at the Inlet, Ocean City, Maryland, United States. The Ocean City Life-Saving Station now serves as the Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum.

                                               

Pea Island Life-Saving Station

Pea Island Life-Saving Station was a life-saving station on Pea Island, on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. It was the first life-saving station in the country to have an all-black crew, and it was the first in the nation to have a black man, R ...

                                               

Point Betsie Light

Point Betsie Light is located on the northeast shore of Lake Michigan - at the southern entrance to the Manitou Passage - north of Frankfort in Benzie County in Northern Michigan. Construction began in 1854, but it was not completed until 1858, a ...

                                               

Texas Tower (lighthouse)

A Texas Tower lighthouse is a structure which is similar to an off-shore oil platform. Seven of these structures were built in the 1960s off the shores of the United States. Automation started in the late 1970s, which led to the obsolescence of t ...

                                               

Cedar Breaks National Monument Caretakers Cabin

The Caretakers Cabin at Cedar Breaks National Monument in Utah was built in 1937 by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the National Park Service rustic style. The cabin was constructed of peeled logs with dramatically extended ends, cut to a tape ...

                                               

Wind Cave National Park Administrative and Utility Area Historic District

The Wind Cave National Park Administrative and Utility Area Historic District comprises the central portion of Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota. The district centers on the historic entrance to Wind Cave, which is surrounded by park admini ...

                                               

Mobile quarantine facility

The mobile quarantine facility is a converted Airstream trailer used by NASA to quarantine astronauts returning from Apollo lunar missions for the first few days after splashdown. The MQF was on the aircraft carrier that picked up the capsule. On ...

                                               

Pest House (Concord, Massachusetts)

The Ephraim Potter House, a historic house and former pest house at 158 Fairhaven Road in Concord, Massachusetts, is also known as the Pest House, a name used in the 18th century to describe a building in which to quarantine those afflicted with ...

                                               

South Atlantic Quarantine Station

Quarantine stations have been in use in the U.S. since 1799, when a center was built for yellow fever containment in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The National Quarantine Act was instituted in 1878, resulting in other centers on the U.S. The Southe ...

                                               

George W. Romney Building

The George W. Romney Building - is the Governor of Michigans main office, and houses other State of Michigan offices. The building is named after George W. Romney, the 43rd Governor and father of Mitt Romney. The building has a ten-story atrium, ...

                                               

State of Georgia Building

The State of Georgia Building, alternately referenced as 2 Peachtree Street, is a 44-story, 566 feet skyscraper located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. Built in 1966, the building was the tallest building in the Southeast at the time. It was A ...

                                               

Elections in Czechoslovakia

In Czechoslovakia the first parliamentary elections to the National Assembly were held in 1920, two years after the country came into existence. They followed the adoption of the 1920 constitution. Prior to the elections, a legislature had been f ...

                                               

Elections in the First Czechoslovak Republic

Parliamentary elections in the First Czechoslovak Republic were held in 1920, 1925, 1929 and 1935. The Czechoslovak National Assembly consisted of two chambers, the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate, both elected through universal suffrage. Duri ...

                                               

1933 Free City of Danzig parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in the Free City of Danzig on 28 May 1933. The National Socialist German Workers Party emerged as the largest party, receiving 50% of the vote and winning 38 of the 72 seats in the Volkstag, the first time any pa ...

                                               

1935 Free City of Danzig parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in the Free City of Danzig on 7 April 1935. The Nazi Party emerged as the largest party, receiving 59% of the vote and winning 43 of the 72 seats in the Volkstag. Voter turnout was reportedly over 99%.

                                               

Independent Womens Association

The Independent Womens Association was a political party that stood for election the 1990 East German general election in coalition with the East German Green Party. The Independent Womens League placed seventh in the elections. It was the only w ...

                                               

Elections in Great Britain

Elections in the Kingdom of Great Britain were principally general elections and by-elections to the House of Commons of Great Britain. General elections did not have fixed dates, as parliament was summoned and dissolved within the royal prerogat ...

                                               

Elections in the Ottoman Empire

Six elections were held in the Ottoman Empire for the Chamber of Deputies, the popularly elected lower house of the General Assembly, the Ottoman parliament: 1914 Ottoman general election 1919 Ottoman general election 1908 Ottoman general electio ...

                                               

Elections in the Soviet Union

The electoral system of the Soviet Union was based upon Chapter XI of the Constitution of the Soviet Union and by the Electoral Laws enacted in conformity with it. The Constitution and laws applied to elections in all Soviets, from the Supreme So ...

                                               

1949 Free Territory of Trieste municipal election

Municipal elections were held in the six municipalities of the Anglo-American occupation zone of the Free Territory of Trieste in June 1949, Trieste, Duino-Aurisina, San Dorligo della Valle, Sgonico, Monrupino and Muggia. There were 197.266 eligi ...

                                               

Wurttemberg Landtag elections in the Weimar Republic

This table shows the historical election results for the Landtag in the Free Peoples State of Wurttemberg, a part of the Weimar Republic. This was the successor state of the former Kingdom of Wurttemberg in southwestern Germany, between the end o ...

                                               

Elections in Yugoslavia

In Yugoslavia, elections were held while it had existed as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, the first one being in 1918 for the Provisional Popular Legislature of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes and the last being the parliamentary election of 1938. Women w ...

                                               

Abul-Hasan Ali ibn Muhammad al-Maghribi

Abul-Hasan Ali ibn Muhammad al-Maghribi was a high-ranking official of the Abbasid Caliphate in the early 10th century. Of Persian origin, he became head of the diwan al-maghrib, the "Bureau of the West", whence his family acquired the nisbah of ...

                                               

Muhammad ibn Sulayman al-Katib

Muhammad ibn Sulayman, surnamed al-Katib, was a senior official and commander of the Abbasid Caliphate, most notable for his victories against the Qarmatians and for his reconquest of Syria and Egypt from the autonomous Tulunid dynasty.

                                               

Jund Hims

Jund Hims was one of the four military districts of the Caliphate province of Syria. Its capital was Homs, from which the district received its name. Its principal urban centres were Latakia, Tadmur, Jableh, Kafr Tab, Tarsus, Salamiyya, Bulunyas ...

                                               

Jund Qinnasrin

Jund Qinnasrīn was one of five sub-provinces of Syria under the Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphate, organized soon after the Muslim conquest of Syria in the 7th century CE. Initially, its capital was Qinnasrin, but as the city declined in population a ...

                                               

Qumis (region)

Qūmis, was an important province in pre-Islamic Persia, lying between the southern Alborz chain watershed and the northern fringes of the Dasht-e Kavir desert. In Sassanian period, it was separating the provinces of Ray and Gurgan. Qumis remained ...

                                               

Dulafid dynasty

The Dulafid or Dolafid dynasty was an Arab dynasty that served as governors of Jibal for the Abbasid caliphs in the 9th century. During the weakening of the authority of the caliphs after 861, their rule in Jibal became increasingly independent o ...

                                               

Mascames

Mascames was a Persian official and military commander, who flourished during the reign of Xerxes I. He was the son of Megadostes, and was appointed governor of Doriscus in 480 BC by Xerxes I, succeeding the governor who had been appointed by Dar ...

                                               

Abdashtart I

Abdashtart I, the son of Baalshillem II, ruled the Phoenician city-state of Sidon from 365 to 352 BC, having been associated in power by his father since the 380s.

                                               

Amyntas II (son of Bubares)

Amyntas II was the son of the Persian official Bubares by his Macedonian wife Gygaea. He was named after his maternal grandfather, Amyntas I of Macedon, who ruled Macedon as a Persian subject since 512/511 BC. Later, king Xerxes I gave him the Ca ...

                                               

Arbinas

Arbinas, also Erbinas, Erbbina, was a Lycian Dynast who ruled circa 430/20-400 BCE. He is most famous for his tomb, the Nereid Monument, now on display in the British Museum. Coinage seems to indicate that he ruled in the western part of Lycia, a ...

                                               

Azemilcus, King of Tyre

Azemilcus was the King of Tyre during its siege by Alexander the Great in 332 BC. Alexander had already peacefully taken Byblos and Sidon, and Tyre sent envoys to Alexander agreeing to do his bidding. His response was to declare that he wished to ...

                                               

Belesys

Belesys was a satrap of Syria for the Achaemenid Empire in the 4th century BCE. Belesys was involved in suppressing the rebellion of Sidon in 351 BCE. After the defeat of Artaxerxes III in his Egyptian campaign, Phoenicia declared independence fr ...

                                               

Kherei

Kherei was dynast of Lycia, ruler of the area of Xanthos, at a time when this part of Anatolia was subject to the Persian, or Achaemenid, Empire. Present-day knowledge of Lycia in the period of classical antiquity comes mostly from archaeology, i ...

                                               

Kuprilli

Kuprilli was a dynast of Lycia, at a time when this part of Anatolia was subject to the Persian, or Achaemenid, Empire. Kuprilli ruled at the time of the Athenian alliance, the Delian League. Present-day knowledge of Lycia in the period of classi ...

                                               

Mithrapata

Mithrapata was dynast of Lycia in the early 4th century BC, at a time when this part of Anatolia was subject to the Persian, or Achaemenid, Empire. Present-day knowledge of Lycia in the period of classical antiquity comes mostly from archaeology, ...

                                               

Pericles, Dynast of Lycia

Perikles, was the last known dynast of Lycia. He ruled c. 380–360 BCE over eastern Lycia from Limyra, at a time when Western Lycia was directly under Persian domination.

                                               

Prokles (Pergamon)

Prokles was a descendant of the exiled Spartan king Demaratus, and ruler of Pergamon in Asia Minor under the Achaemenid Empire. He was a brother of Eurysthenes, with whom he was a joint ruler. After his deposition in 491 BC Demaratus had fled to ...

                                               

Strattis of Chios

Strattis of Chios was an ancient Greek tyrant who ruled the Aegean island of Chios during the late 6th and early 5th centuries BC. Strattis was one of a group of Greek tyrants from Ionia and the Hellespont who were vassals of the Persian king Dar ...

                                               

Syloson

Syloson governed Samos as a vassal ruler on behalf of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. He was appointed by king Darius I and was the brother of Polycrates of Samos. When Polycrates became tyrant of the island he exiled Syloson. Syloson went to Egyp ...

                                               

Tabnit

Tabnit was the Phoenician king of Sidon circa 490 BCE, He was the father of King Eshmunazar II. He is well known from his sarcophagus, decorated with two separate and unrelated inscriptions – one in Egyptian hieroglyphics and one in Phoenician sc ...

                                               

Tennes

Tennes was a king of Sidon under the Achaemenid Empire. His predecessor was Abdashtart I, the son of Baalshillem II, who ruled the Phoenician city-state of Sidon from 365 to 352 BC, having been associated in power by his father since the 380s. It ...

                                               

Achaemenid Arabia

Arabia or Achaemenid Arabia was a satrapy of the Achaemenid Empire by the name of Arabaya. Achaemenid Arabia corresponded to the lands between Nile Delta and Mesopotamia, later known to Romans as Arabia Petraea. According to Herodotus, Cambyses d ...

                                               

Cappadocia (satrapy)

Cappadocia was a satrapy of the Achaemenid Empire used by the Achaemenids to administer the regions beyond the Taurus Mountains and the Euphrates river.