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Nondepressive disorder

A nondepressive disorder is a psychological disorder that includes no depressive symptoms. They were formerly very commonly diagnosed in young women. The antidepressant amitriptyline has been suggested as a treatment for nondepressive disorders. ...

                                               

Olfactory reference syndrome

Olfactory reference syndrome is a psychiatric condition in which there is a persistent false belief and preoccupation with the idea of emitting abnormal body odors which the patient thinks are foul and offensive to other individuals. People with ...

                                               

Primary and secondary gain

Primary morbid gain or secondary morbid gain are used in medicine to describe the significant subconscious psychological motivators patients may have when presenting with symptoms. It is important to note that if these motivators are recognized b ...

                                               

Psychiatric disorders of childbirth

Psychiatric disorders of childbirth are mental disorders developed by the mother related to the delivery process itself. They overlap with the organic prepartum and postpartum psychoses and other psychiatric conditions associated with having chil ...

                                               

Psychomotor retardation

Psychomotor retardation involves a slowing-down of thought and a reduction of physical movements in an individual. Psychomotor retardation can cause a visible slowing of physical and emotional reactions, including speech and affect. Psychomotor r ...

                                               

Schizoaffective disorder

Schizoaffective disorder is a mental disorder characterized by abnormal thought processes and an unstable mood. The diagnosis is made when the person has symptoms of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder - either bipolar disorder or depression - ...

                                               

Schizophreniform disorder

Schizophreniform disorder is a mental disorder diagnosed when symptoms of schizophrenia are present for a significant portion of the time at least a month, but signs of disturbance are not present for the full six months required for the diagnosi ...

                                               

Schizothymia

Schizothymia is a temperament related to schizophrenia in a way analogous to cyclothymias relationship with bipolar disorder. A schizothymic individual displays a flat affect and a high degree of introversion, withdrawing from social relations ge ...

                                               

Services for mental disorders

Services for mental health disorders provide treatment, support, or advocacy to people who have psychiatric illnesses. These may include medical, behavioral, social, and legal services. Medical services are usually provided by mental health exper ...

                                               

Sexual maturation disorder

Sexual maturation disorder is a disorder of anxiety or depression related to an uncertainty about ones gender identity or sexual orientation. The World Health Organization lists sexual maturation disorder in the ICD-10, under "Psychological and b ...

                                               

Sexual relationship disorder

Sexual relationship disorder is a disorder where a person has difficulties in forming or maintaining a sexual relationship because of their gender identity or sexual orientation. The World Health Organization lists sexual relationship disorder in ...

                                               

Smile mask syndrome

Smile mask syndrome, abbreviated SMS, is a psychological disorder proposed by professor Makoto Natsume of Osaka Shoin Womens University, in which subjects develop depression and physical illness as a result of prolonged, unnatural smiling. Natsum ...

                                               

Social Interaction Anxiety Scale

The Social Interaction Anxiety Scale is a self-report scale that measures distress when meeting and talking with others that is widely used in clinical settings and among social anxiety researchers. The measure assesses social anxiety disorder, w ...

                                               

Stanford Sleepiness Scale

The Stanford Sleepiness Scale, developed by Dement and colleagues in 1972, is a one-item self-report questionnaire measuring levels of sleepiness throughout the day. The scale, which can be administered in 1–2 minutes, is generally used to track ...

                                               

Stereotypy

A stereotypy is a repetitive or ritualistic movement, posture, or utterance. Stereotypies may be simple movements such as body rocking, or complex, such as self-caressing, crossing and uncrossing of legs, and marching in place. They are found in ...

                                               

Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Teacher and Parent Rating Scale

The Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, developed by James Swanson, Edith Nolan and William Pelham, is a 90-question self-report inventory designed to measure attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defian ...

                                               

Misconduct

In law, misconduct is wrongful, improper, or unlawful conduct motivated by premeditated or intentional purpose or by obstinate indifference to the consequences of ones acts. Misconduct can be considered an unacceptable or improper behavior, espec ...

                                               

Duty to report misconduct

The duty to report misconduct is one of the ethical duties imposed on attorneys in the United States by the rules governing professional responsibility. With certain exceptions, an attorney who becomes aware that either a fellow attorney or a jud ...

                                               

Attorney misconduct

Attorney misconduct is unethical or illegal conduct by an attorney. Attorney misconduct may include: conflict of interest, over billing, refusing to represent a client for political or professional motives, false or misleading statements, hiding ...

                                               

Data dredging

Data dredging is the misuse of data analysis to find patterns in data that can be presented as statistically significant, thus dramatically increasing and understating the risk of false positives. This is done by performing many statistical tests ...

                                               

Fouls and misconduct (association football)

In the sport of association football, fouls and misconduct are acts committed by players which are deemed by the referee to be unfair and are subsequently penalised. An offence may be a foul, misconduct or both depending on the nature of the offe ...

                                               

Juror misconduct

Juror misconduct is when the law of the court is violated by a member of the jury while a court case is in progression or after it has reached a verdict. Misconduct can take several forms: Communication by the jury with those outside of the trial ...

                                               

Medical ghostwriter

Medical ghostwriters are employed by pharmaceutical companies and medical-device manufacturers to produce apparently independent manuscripts for peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and other communications. Physicians and other scien ...

                                               

Official misconduct

                                               

Police misconduct

Police misconduct refers to inappropriate conduct and/or illegal actions taken by police officers in connection with their official duties. Types of misconduct include: coerced false confession, intimidation, false arrest, false imprisonment, fal ...

                                               

Prosecutorial misconduct

In jurisprudence, prosecutorial misconduct is "an illegal act or failing to act, on the part of a prosecutor, especially an attempt to sway the jury to wrongly convict a defendant or to impose a harsher than appropriate punishment." It is similar ...

                                               

Sexual misconduct

Sexual misconduct is any misconduct of a sexual nature that is of lesser offense than felony sexual assault, particularly where the situation is normally non-sexual and therefore unusual for sexual behavior, or where there is some aspect of perso ...

                                               

Tardiness

Tardiness is the habit of being late or delaying arrival. Being late as a form of misconduct may be formally punishable in various arrangements, such as workplace, school, etc. An opposite personality trait is punctuality.

                                               

Unsportsmanlike conduct

Unsportsmanlike conduct is a foul or offense in many sports that violates the sports generally accepted rules of sportsmanship and participant conduct. Examples include verbal abuse or taunting of an opponent, an excessive celebration following a ...

                                               

3C-model

The 3C-model of motivation was developed by Professor Hugo M. Kehr, PhD., at UC Berkeley. The 3C-model is an integrative, empirically validated theory of motivation that can be used for systematic motivation diagnosis and intervention.

                                               

Aboulia

Aboulia or abulia, in neurology, refers to a lack of will or initiative and can be seen as a disorder of diminished motivation. Aboulia falls in the middle of the spectrum of diminished motivation, with apathy being less extreme and akinetic muti ...

                                               

Amotivational syndrome

Amotivational syndrome is characterized by detachment, blunted emotion and drives, and executive functions like memory and attention are impaired; it is primarily associated with long-term effects of cannabis use. Pacheco-Colon et al. concludes: ...

                                               

Arise, awake, and stop not till the goal is reached

Arise, awake, and stop not till the goal is reached is a slogan popularized in the late 19th century by Indian Hindu monk Swami Vivekananda, who took inspiration in a sloka of Katha Upanishad. It was his message to the world to get out of their h ...

                                               

Body-centred countertransference

Body-centred countertransference involves a psychotherapists experiencing the physical state of the patient in a clinical context. Also known as somatic countertransference, it can incorporate the therapists gut feelings, as well as changes to br ...

                                               

Choice

Choice involves decision making. It can include judging the merits of multiple options and selecting one or more of them. One can make a choice between imagined options or between real options followed by the corresponding action. For example, a ...

                                               

Cognitive evaluation theory

Cognitive evaluation theory is a theory in psychology that is designed to explain the effects of external consequences on internal motivation. Specifically, CET is a sub-theory of self-determination theory that focuses on competence and autonomy ...

                                               

Comparator hypothesis

The comparator hypothesis is a psychological model of associative learning and performance. To understand the model, it helps to consider how associative learning is usually studied. For example, to study the learning of an association between cu ...

                                               

Cooling out

Cooling out is an informal set of practices used by colleges, especially two-year, junior, and community colleges, to handle students whose lack of academic ability or other resources prevent them from achieving the educational goals they have de ...

                                               

Decisional balance sheet

A decisional balance sheet or decision balance sheet is a tabular method for representing the pros and cons of different choices and for helping someone decide what to do in a certain circumstance. It is often used in working with ambivalence in ...

                                               

Defensive pessimism

Defensive pessimism is a cognitive strategy identified by Nancy Cantor and her students in the mid-1980s. Individuals use defensive pessimism as a strategy to prepare for anxiety-provoking events or performances. When implementing defensive pessi ...

                                               

Disincentive

A disincentive is something that discourages an individual from performing an action. It is the antonym of incentive. Disincentives may fall within the scope of economics, social issues or politics.

                                               

Dopamine

Dopamine is an organic chemical of the catecholamine and phenethylamine families. It functions both as a hormone and a neurotransmitter, and plays several important roles in the brain and body. It is an amine synthesized by removing a carboxyl gr ...

                                               

Double demotivation

Double demotivation is a theory involving pay and motivation first postulated by S.C. Carr and MacLachlan. Double demotivation hypothesises that pay discrepancies decrease work motivation among both lower and higher paid individuals who essential ...

                                               

Drive reduction theory (learning theory)

In learning theory, drive reduction theory is a type of motivational theory. Drive Reduction Theory, developed by Clark Hull in 1943, was a major theory for motivation in the Behaviorist tradition. Drive itself was defined as motivation that aros ...

                                               

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us is the fourth non-fiction book by Daniel Pink. The book was published in 2009 by Riverhead Hardcover. It argues that human motivation is largely intrinsic, and that the aspects of this motivatio ...

                                               

Effort optimism

Effort optimism is the confidence that acquiring the skills valued by majority society, such as those skills measured by IQ tests, ACT, and SATs, are worthwhile. This outlook is grounded on different cultural belief systems that link effort with ...

                                               

Effortfulness

In psychology, effortfulness is the subjective experience of exertion when performing an activity, especially the mental concentration and energy required. In many applications, effortfulness is simply reported by a patient, client, or experiment ...

                                               

Ego depletion

Ego depletion refers to the idea that self-control or willpower draws upon a limited pool of mental resources that can be used up. When the energy for mental activity is low, self-control is typically impaired, which would be considered a state o ...

                                               

Employee morale

Long used by the military as a "mission-critical" measure of the psychological readiness of troops, high morale has been shown to be a powerful driver of performance in all organizations. Extensive research demonstrates its benefits in productivi ...

                                               

Employee motivation

Employee motivation, i.e. methods for motivating employees, is an intrinsic and internal drive to put forth the necessary effort and action towards work-related activities. It has been broadly defined as the "psychological forces that determine t ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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